Category Archives: Environmental Impact Assessment

Matrices in Environmental Impact Assessment-Continued…

I covered the three most popular form of matrices in my previous post, namely, Simple Matrix, Leopold Matrix, and the Component Interaction Matrix.

However, each project has different necessities and around the world, different EIA teams have come up with specific assessment matrices that will best suit their project/their country. In this post, we’ll take a look at some of the other lesser known, but nevertheless, effective assessment matrices.

Continue reading Matrices in Environmental Impact Assessment-Continued…

Advertisements

How are Environmental Impact Assessments regulated? A look at the legislation in India

The process of EIA, though globally accepted and followed, still have many differences specific to the conditions in each country.  In India, EIA has been a mandatory process since the EIA notification became part of India’s legislation in 1994. Since then, many amendments and modifications have been made by the government to improve (or dilute) the EIA process.

It is important to note that EIA still remains a huge challenge in developing countries. This is because they are still keen on achieving the economic prosperity of the West. However, EIA is posing a big challenge to these governments by making them think twice about mindlessly expanding their businesses and industries. This can be seen in this post, as I describe the key regulations passed by the Indian government over the course of 12 years. Continue reading How are Environmental Impact Assessments regulated? A look at the legislation in India

Monitoring in EIA

Is it enough to suggest mitigation measures and let things be? Of course not! That will be like asking a kid not to touch the remote and then leaving the kid in the house to go shopping!

The final step of the Environmental Impact Assessment is the longest one, and continues during (constructional phase) and after (operational phase) the completion of the project. Continue reading Monitoring in EIA

Mitigation Hierarchy: Levels of mitigation in Environmental Impact Assessment

Mitigation is vital to the process of EIA, because it ensures that the adverse environmental impacts of a developmental project are minimized or completely avoided. Mitigation comes with a variety of levels, and this is commonly called as “mitigation hierarchy” in EIA literature. In this post, I’ll be talking in detail about this hierarchy, and the concept of offsets in the developmental project. Continue reading Mitigation Hierarchy: Levels of mitigation in Environmental Impact Assessment

Prediction and mitigation of impacts

After we have screened a project to see if it requires an EIA or not, and after we have conducted the scoping process (which includes baseline study, impact assessment in the form of checklists/matrices/networks and creating a ToR), we come to the third step of Environmental Impact Assessment: Prediction and Mitigation.

This step is the heart of the EIA process. From our impact assessment, we were able to identify the impact our developmental activities will have on our project area and it’s environmental aspects. We also gave it numerical values of magnitude and significance (in the case of matrices). Using this information, we can focus our attention on their supposed effect on the environment. Continue reading Prediction and mitigation of impacts

Networks in Environmental Impact Assessment

The third common method of assessing impacts in EIA is called the Network method (checklists and matrices are the other two). This was first given by Sorenson in 1971, primarily to explain linkages between different environmental aspects. It is solely used to illustrate and understand primary, secondary and tertiary impacts of a developmental activity. Continue reading Networks in Environmental Impact Assessment

Matrices in Environmental Impact Assessment

There are many methods by which we can assess the impact of a developmental project on our site and it’s various components. The simplest of these methods are checklists, which I’ve written about before.

Checklists were too primitive to be used for large-scale projects. A step  higher from the checklists is the matrices form of impact assessment in EIA. Continue reading Matrices in Environmental Impact Assessment